Book Review: I’m Nobody, The Lost Pages by Alex Marestaing

I'm Nobody: The Lost Pages Cover Art

Alex Marestaing is one of the many, many (very many) authors that contact me daily through the blog. I may not have hundreds of followers, but I have hundreds of authors, publishers, agents, etc. contact me about reviewing their books. This, obviously, is an awesome thing and a not-so-awesome thing. You see…I love books. I love reading. I especially love reading good books. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to read every single book that is offered to me, but I try to let every author/publisher/agent/etc. know up front whether or not I’ll be able to read their book.

This little green book arrived in the mail a few weeks ago (like…June) and it’s been riding around with me ever since, just waiting for me to get around to it. The cover was intriguing, so it was going to get read…eventually.

The green book, being an actual book and not a digital copy (props to the author for sending that to me) got pushed to the top of the list.

I finished it in one day and it was PHENOMENAL. Here it goes:

Targeted to middle grades and possible early high school grades, I’m Nobody: The Lost Pages is about a teenage boy, Caleb, who hasn’t stepped outside his house for seven years. He’s haunted by the house across the street. A seemingly magical event occurs (or rather, course of events); Caleb makes a friend, Iris, who is a teen indie-filmmaker. Parents try to institutionalize him; back-story is revealed; Emily Dickinson is still writing; magic is real. The End.

Emily Dickenson's House was the inspiration for the "house across the street"...Now, imagine a basket coming down from the window ; )

Emily Dickinson’s House was the inspiration for the “house across the street”…Now, imagine a basket coming down from the window ; )

Did I love it? YES!

I’m Nobody: The Lost Pages was such a refreshing read. It covered topics that most middle grades books don’t touch, including mental illness in youth, open-mindedness, and bravery. I cheered for Caleb throughout his story, celebrating every little step and each small achievement as he built up the courage to rebound to normalcy, despite his parents absent support. This, actually, was the most sad part of Caleb’s story: he didn’t know anything was “wrong” with him until his parents started trying to make him “better.”

The characters, Caleb and Iris, are teenagers, but young enough that a crush is a new experience for both of them. I was very happy that a romance was not the center of this story, but instead, a budding friendship. Both sides must overcome adversity to see each other as friends, and it’s written in a charming and beautiful way.

Emily Dickinson and her poetry play a pivotal role in this story; one that is more original than anything else you’ve read recently, I’m sure. The history of Dickinson and her writings were incorporated in a wondrous way, such that they were as inspiring to me as they were to Caleb.

An example of Dickenson's writing, this is what Caleb found as each of his notes arrived. The descriptions of her writing, even down to the stationary, are phenomenal.

An example of Dickinson’s writing, this is what Caleb found as each of his notes arrived. The descriptions of her writing, even down to the stationary, are phenomenal.

As many of you know, I have a knack for figuring out story lines, but I was pleasantly surprised with this book. I had a general idea, but I certainly wasn’t prepared for the revelation of the basis of Caleb’s mental illness and the unhappiness inside his home. Overall, the story was heartbreaking. I was really hoping for a happy ending…I’ll let you read it to find out if I got it or not ; )

This book was published in December, 2013, so it’s available for you to pick up now. A copy of the book was sent to me for review, and, being a wonderfully honest person, I provided an honest review at no charge (because who wants to charge authors to send them books?!).

Have you read any good middle grades books lately? Let me know in the comment box what you thought.

Read Up!

 

 

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